Curation is the Future

Lately I’ve been thinking a lot about the need for curation services online. The amount of content we are exposed to daily is out of control. Outside of personal communication content (email, text, photos, instagrams, facebook posts and messages, etc) we consume an amazing amount of content daily online. Sorting through all the content at our fingertips is at worst impossible and at best overwhelming.

The amount of content served to us online is ridiculous!

The amount of content served to us online is ridiculous!

One set of curation tools is our personal network. Links are recommended via email. Videos are posted to facebook. Articles are tweeted. Some content is specifically recommended for us, and some is blasted out indiscriminately. These are all sources for content, but what truly excites me is the emergence of standalone curation services. By that, I mean services that are built for curation, not a friend emailing you a link to a funny video.

Several standalone content curation services already impress me. The first is the app Prismatic, an outstanding app that surfaces content (mostly print articles) based off your social presence online. I check in with Prismatic a few times a day and am ALWAYS met with interesting articles. Another tool I love is Devour, which hand picks the best new video content. Devour’s content is edgy, and shows how human led curation remains far better than algorithms. These two services use very different strategies to successfully recommend content. While Prismatic bases their recommendations off my tastes, Devour’s curation is based of their tastes.

Some content farms have in-house curation tools. My NYTimes digital front page is different from yours, tailored to my past clicks and interests. The same can be said for my youtube homepage. However, the intention of any in-house curation tools is to keep you in-network, maximizing your time spent on THEIR site. That is why I love content curation services that are unaffiliated from content farms. They are selfless. They are exciting. They serve me with personalized content, which I sure do love to consume.

Everyone loves to consumer online

Everyone loves to consumer online

The emergence of these tools will have a variety of effects. For the consumer, it offers a promise of premium content. However, as these tools further democratize the net, curation services will put additional pressure on established producers to create GREAT content. With so much noise, good just won’t cut through anymore.

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Interesting? 

Playlists Are(n’t) The New Album

Sean Parker is very fond of saying, “Playlists are the New Album.” He’s a tremendous salesman and one of his products, Spotify is in the business of playlists. However, as much as I love Spotify as a tool for music discovery and consumption, I do not love it as a tool for music curation. The reason? Playlists are too much work.

The renowned Venture Capitalist Fred Wilson is a believer in the power of curation. He states, “I’ve got a few simple frameworks for thinking about things. In social media, one of my main ones is the tenet that 1% of the users will create content, 10% will curate it, and the rest will consume it.” In the above linked article, he is making the case that the inclusion of the simple “like” button in Foursquare’s newly redesigned mobile application will allow users to better curate social content, which is vital to the success of the platform. Ease of curation for the user is incredibly important for any content-based platform.

Spotify is inherently different from Foursqaure. It is not a social media platform. It is most fundamentally a music listening service. However, there is a major disconnect in Spotify’s interface between all the content (millions and millions of songs) and the listener. The disconnect, simply put, is that it is hard to discover from and organize all that music into a format I want to listen to.

I am lazy with music. I do not like to take the time to build or curate playlists. Sure, I subscribe to some playlists which are good for music discovery, but the makeup of these playlists is not foolproof. Instead, I am forced to haphazardly toss music randomly into playlists in a disorganized format just to hold onto artists/albums/songs I like. There is not even a basic Itunesesque library function to hold all the music I want to remember from Spotify’s vast libraries.

This disconnect creates a tremendous amount of work for me, the user. It makes curation of my “library” extremely difficult. In addition, it is difficult to navigate within playlists. There is no easy search/sort feature that spans all playlists like in Itunes. I am instead forced to scroll for days. Searching for music is too much work.

The Search Bar Doesn’t Even Function Within Playlists

Sean Parker states that the Playlist is the new Album. He wants to believe it. But in Spotify’s current form, playlists are too difficult. They create too much work. They are difficult to curate, and they cause me, the user (a premium user, at that!) stress and anger. If I, the user, am going to pay for the ability to consume a service’s content, I want the curation to be straightforward and easy.

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