Curation is the Future

Lately I’ve been thinking a lot about the need for curation services online. The amount of content we are exposed to daily is out of control. Outside of personal communication content (email, text, photos, instagrams, facebook posts and messages, etc) we consume an amazing amount of content daily online. Sorting through all the content at our fingertips is at worst impossible and at best overwhelming.

The amount of content served to us online is ridiculous!

The amount of content served to us online is ridiculous!

One set of curation tools is our personal network. Links are recommended via email. Videos are posted to facebook. Articles are tweeted. Some content is specifically recommended for us, and some is blasted out indiscriminately. These are all sources for content, but what truly excites me is the emergence of standalone curation services. By that, I mean services that are built for curation, not a friend emailing you a link to a funny video.

Several standalone content curation services already impress me. The first is the app Prismatic, an outstanding app that surfaces content (mostly print articles) based off your social presence online. I check in with Prismatic a few times a day and am ALWAYS met with interesting articles. Another tool I love is Devour, which hand picks the best new video content. Devour’s content is edgy, and shows how human led curation remains far better than algorithms. These two services use very different strategies to successfully recommend content. While Prismatic bases their recommendations off my tastes, Devour’s curation is based of their tastes.

Some content farms have in-house curation tools. My NYTimes digital front page is different from yours, tailored to my past clicks and interests. The same can be said for my youtube homepage. However, the intention of any in-house curation tools is to keep you in-network, maximizing your time spent on THEIR site. That is why I love content curation services that are unaffiliated from content farms. They are selfless. They are exciting. They serve me with personalized content, which I sure do love to consume.

Everyone loves to consumer online

Everyone loves to consumer online

The emergence of these tools will have a variety of effects. For the consumer, it offers a promise of premium content. However, as these tools further democratize the net, curation services will put additional pressure on established producers to create GREAT content. With so much noise, good just won’t cut through anymore.

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Interesting? 

I hate to admit it, but I totally get Snapchat

I’ve been thinking a lot about Snapchat lately. I just got an Iphone 5, and have begun messing around with Snapchat. My friends have raved about how fun Snapchat is for several months but I’ve resisted, mostly due to the “creepiness” factor.

My Snapchat Inbox

My Snapchat Inbox

After using the app, I have quickly reversed my opinion of it. Today, online presences are tightly curated (facebook, twitter, instagram). We only want to show the world things that reflect well upon us. This inhibition is quite limiting when it comes to social interaction. As there are countless horror stories with inappropriate texts or emails going viral, I share many peoples nerves when employing digital communication tools. They are permanent. That’s exactly what makes Snapchat beautiful. Because no communication on Snapchat is permanent, it allows for much fuller expression.

 

Yes, Snapchat is used for sexting. However, it’s potential as an impermanent communication tool is vast. It allows users to express themselves freely, unafraid of the now commonplace repercussions for rash decision online.

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Snapchat recently raised over $20 million in venture funding. I’m excited to see what’s next.

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Interesting? 

The Death of Banner Ads

As long as I’ve been online, the Internet has been packed with advertisements. The majority of these ads are banner advertisements, the simple display ads that populate every site from ESPN to Gmail. Thankfully, the old, boring banner advertisement is slowly dying. In the past, everyone who visited a webpage in a set period of time was served the same banner advertisement.  Since their inception, banner ads have employed very basic, unimpressive technology that does little to optimize the dollars spent on the ad. This is changing as ads become tailored to the unique visitor. The evolution of online advertising from the basic banner ad benefits all parties: users (who probably prefer consuming higher quality advertisements), the advertising party (who is producing more effective advertising), and the company selling the ad space (with higher conversion rates come larger revenues).

Everything in red is advertisements. These panels take up most of the screen!!

One of the more exciting advertising innovations can be found in social. Because social media and search firms have enormous amounts of data regarding users’ individual interests, they tailor advertisements to the specific user (social or local optimization: i.e., what a users friends like, and what is geographically relevant to the user). More recently however, even tailored advertising seems flawed, as smaller screens (mobile) do not have the space to waste on additional panels. In response, both Facebook and Twitter have introduced native ads, which are placed directly into their users’ respective feeds. By placing native ads directly into a stream, there isn’t any wasted screen space, which must be used sparingly on mobile devices.

Banner ads are generally considered a waste of screen space.  However, as native ads have emerged, firms have begun producing advertisements more appropriate to online consumption. Funny videos or deals that can be easily shared and spread through the social web are becoming commonplace. Essentially, online ads aren’t total crap anymore, and when tailored for a specific audience, they can be much more effective.

Last year, Hulu made a fascinating change to their advertising policy. Going forward, Hulu only charges advertisers for ads watched in their entirety. If a viewer does not watch an entire ad, the advertiser doesn’t pay. First, I doubt there has been much financial fallout from this, as on Hulu, ads are shown between segments of a show. Viewers either close out of a tab before advertisements begin or they wait until the show restarts, as in most cases they have already decided whether to continue watching.  In addition, Hulu must have had lots of data before making this policy change and deemed it worthy. Second, this generous policy allows Hulu to enforce a higher standard for ads on their platform. Premium ads stand out online, so the higher standard may in turn make users happier to consumer ads. Personally, I find the ad content on Hulu to be much better than Youtube, and 100x better than a basic banner advertisement. Hulu delivers outstanding content to me for free, so watching a few premium ads is hardly bothersome.I understand the necessity, and don’t feel taken advantage of.

There had been very little innovation in Internet advertising, but that has changed drastically over the past few years. Tablets and high-definition screens create opportunities for more immersive, full-page ads. Social and local optimization generates more useful content for users. As conversion rates improve, so will the economic strength of the entire digital media ecosystem who depend on advertising for revenues. It’s an exciting prospect.