Jeff Bezos on Charlie Rose

Just watched the Charlie Rose interview with Jeff Bezos. Twas very interesting. Bezos is an extremely passionate guy, a trait I find fascinating after running Amazon for 18 years. The interview left me with several thoughts I wanted to share:

  • Inventors, Not Disruptors: Bezos kept harping on how Amazon focuses on inventing, not necessarily disrupting. He views disruption as a byproduct, even a consequence of great invention.
  • Customer Focus Above All Else: The other central component of Amazon’s identity is being customer focused. They are constantly asking themselves “What do the customers want?” “What will they love?” “What do customers need and how can we make getting it easier/cheaper/better?”
  • The Internet is still in its infancy: Bezos believes that the societal reinvention brought on by the Internet is very young. he believes we are still in Day 1, as things are moving faster than ever. When it begins to slow, he says, we are in Day 2.
  • Brick and Mortar is not in Amazon’s immediate plans: Again, Bezos is focused on invention. He is only interested in getting in brick and mortar if Amazon can bring something new to the table. He is not interested in a “me to” approach to retail. All about invention.
  • He’s an optimist, and has a hearty laugh.

Watching the interview gives two clues as to why Amazon has persisted and flourished for so long. First, as Bezos states, there was an incredible demand for such a company. They filled a clear gap in the market. Bezos says that the hardest times for Amazon was the process of raising money to found it. Success was almost instantaneous.

The other clue is Bezos himself. He has an incredibly impressive eagle’s view of the Internet/Ecommerce/Technology industry, and approaches every decision through the lenses of customer focus, invention, and teamwork. Listening to Jeff makes the staying power of Amazon much less mysterious. He has incredible vision.

What a fascinating guy.

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Interesting? 

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A Conversation About Facebook With An Old Person

I sat down with my writing Professor today. He’s a great guy, worked at Newsweek for many years. Our talk eventually turned to Facebook.  I was shocked to hear that he first joined about 3 years ago… and LOVED it.

My prof spoke about how easy it was to use and how fun it was connecting and reconnecting with people.  However, he deleted his account about 6 months ago. When I asked him why, all he said was, “too much crap!”

The Facebook experience is too crowded. Yes, I still check it daily, but that is only because I want to see if friends have contacted me (yes, FB still has potent network effects). However, I never post anymore. The reason is because spending time on the service is becoming rather obnoxious. I am constantly getting notifications for things I do not care about. Most of my newsfeed is stuff I simply do not wish to read.

Twitter and Prismatic. Those deliver great content directly to me. It’s all curated. Facebook is a mess.

Startup School Recap Part 2: Joel Spolsky, StackExchange

Joel Spolsky reassured me.

As a student very interested in technical entrepreneurship, most of what I read about are the companies getting tons of press. These “hot” companies are the ones most people know. This isn’t unreasonable, as it makes sense that Facebook appears on TechCrunch more often than KissMetrics. However, as I want to work for a startup (and perhaps one day found my own) this is very intimidating. There can only be so many billion dollar ideas, and the smaller successes tend to get lost in the clutter of Silicon Valley reporting/analysis.

There is a sense that the only successes an entrepreneur can have is to build an enormous company (billions of dollars of value), or sell your smaller company to one of those larger firms. Joel Spolsky directly addressed this apprehension of mine.

In relating the details of his two major entrepreneurial endeavors (Fog Creek and Stack Exchange), Joel spoke about how there IS still opportunity for small bootstrapped businesses to find success. Specifically, he encourages entrepreneurs to figure out the market for your company EARLY.

1) The “Land Grab” Scenario: Get Big Fast

  • Network Effects- The more users you have, the more valuable the network is. Think Facebook, its value lies in the # of users. I want to be on Facebook because everyone I know is on Facebook.
  • Scale Quickly- Network Effects create Lock In. No one is going to leave Facebook for a social network that is 50% or even 100% better, as all of their friends are already on Facebook. That value cannot be as easily replicated as product features.
  • Make lots of Mistakes- Iterate quickly. Move fast and learn as you go. Mistakes can be covered up through VC money that you raise externally. Mistakes won’t cost customers like in bootstrapped business.
  • Take VC Money- Don’t fret about profitability from the start. Instead, focus on growth.
  • For Joel, Stack Exchange is an example of this type of scenario (well built question and answer sites). Network Effects are HUGE in this space.

2) The “Organic Growth” Model: Grow Slowly With Paying Customers

  • Bootstrap- Live very cheaply. Build a product that you can begin to sell immediately. Reinvest everything in company.
  • Market Fit- Unlike “Land Grab,” where there is probably an open market, the marketplace is going to be crowded with competitors in an Org Growth model.
  • Don’t Make Mistakes- You need to retain paying customers to survive! Mistakes can KILL your business.
  • Growth- Slow and steady. You are trying to steal customers, one by one, from your competitors. You must be in it for the long hall.
  • End Goal- It isn’t to sell the company or be acquired. It is to build a long term, sustainable business.
  • For Joel, Fog Creek Software took an Organic Growth model.

This was my take on his speech, and it really put me at ease. There is still hope for entrepreneurs who just want to build a viable business; companies don’t need 25 Million users to be successful.

You can watch Joel’s speech here.

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Interesting? 

Startup School Recap: Ben Silbermann, Pinterest

Last weekend, I attended Y Combinator’s Startup School at Stanford. To say the least, it was an empowering, informative experience. Not only did I meet many like minded individuals, but sitting in on talks from the leaders of the tech world was just plain awesome. Over the next several days, I’m going to publish short recaps/responses to my favorite presentations of the day.

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Ben Silbermann, the co-founder and CEO of Pinterest gave one of my favorite talks of the day. In short, he spoke about tenacity. He described feeling this overwhelming passion to build a great product, one that truly added value to people’s lives. Pinterest, despite all its current success, started extremely slowly. Neither Ben nor his original co-founder are technical wizzes. Many, many investors passed on Pinterest as it struggled to gain traction. People did not understand the product. The challenges seemed endless.

Yet, Ben was very encouraging. He said that we should take advice, even from very accomplished individuals, with a grain of salt. Want proof? look at the returns in the venture capitol industry! The fail:success ratio is not pretty. Instead, trust your gut!

Many entrepreneurs spoke about hard work, disruption, or product integrity. All are valuable. But Ben’s speech stood above the rest for me. His passion for EVERYONE to unabashedly pursue their dreams was very empowering. It made me feel like Pinterest would be an amazing place to work.

Sidenote: The potential business model for Pinterest was extremely intriguing. Not your standard add-based model for a social site (future post coming).

Here’s the video of Ben Silbermann’s talk.

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Interesting?